Internationally Trained Lawyers and Graduates

Click here if you would like to learn more about our upcoming ITL Conferences in Calgary and Edmonton. 

If you would like to practice law in Alberta, there are steps you must follow. 

  1. The National Committee on Accreditation (NCA) Process - If you do not have a Canadian common law degree, you must have your degree evaluated by the National Committee on Accreditation (NCA). The NCA is a standing committee of the Federation of Law Societies of Canada with a primary mandate of protecting the public interest by assessing the legal education and profession experience of individuals who obtained their credentials outside Canada or in a Canadian civil law program. A national uniform standard is applied to each applicant and the qualification process varies dependent on additional NCA Exams or courses which may be required. The NCA is a separate entity to the Law Society so please direct any questions you may have to their office.

  2. Law Society Student-at Law Enrolment Process - Once you have met the requirements for the NCA and they have sent the Certificate of Qualification to the Law Society, you must apply for student-at-law status with the Law Society. The requirements and forms are located here. You will need to complete the articling process. This involves finding a lawyer to article with for a one year period. In addition, students-at-law must complete the CPLED program which is a six-month bar admission course which can be completed at the same time as your articles. CPLED is run by the Legal Education Society of Alberta (LESA) and all documentation can be found on their website.

  3. Law Society Member Enrolment Process - Following completion of articling and CPLED, you can apply to become a member of the Law Society. The requirements and forms are located here.

We are currently working to expand this section to provide a comprehensive resource for internationally trained lawyers and graduates. Click here to request additional information.

Additional Resources:

Law Society of Alberta Process Flow Chart